Health

Prostate cancer symptoms: Blood in semen could be sign of the deadly disease

Prostate cancer often grows slowly in the body. The symptoms of the disease may only begin to become noticeable after many years. Most men with early prostate cancer don’t have changes that they notice. However, some prostate cancer grows quickly and is more likely to spread. This is more likely to cause problems and needs treatment to stop it from spreading further. Prostate cancer that’s contained inside the prostate doesn’t usually cause any symptoms. This is why it’s important for a person to know the signs and risks of the disease. Noticing the following sign in your semen could be something to watch out for.

Noticing blood in the semen is a symptom of advanced prostate cancer, according to Macmillan Cancer Support. It said: “Symptoms of an enlarged prostate cancer may be due to an enlarged prostate.

Other symptoms of an enlarged prostate include a difficulty peeing, for example a weak flow or having to strain to start peeing.

Needing to pee more often than usual, especially at night. Feeling like you have not completely emptied your bladder after peeing, and rarely, experiencing pain when peeing or ejaculating are signs of the disease.

You may also have symptoms if the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The symptoms will depend on which part of the body is affected. But the most common place for prostate cancer to spread to is the bones.”

The American Cancer Society said on their website: “Cancer can start any place in the body.

“Prostate cancer starts in the prostate gland and spreads to other parts of the body.

“Cancer cells in the prostate can sometimes travel to the bones or other organs and grow there. When cancer cells do this, it’s called metastasis.”

If a person experiences any symptoms of the disease, a PSA blood test is recommended. “PSA is a protein that’s made by the prostate gland and can be found in the blood.

“Prostate cancer can make PSA levels go up. Blood tests will be done to see what your PSA level is and how it changes over time,” added American Cancer Society.

As prostate cancer often grows slowly, some men, especially those who are older and with health problems, may never need treatment at all.

Your GP may plan to keep track of the cancer without treating it, this is known as observation and this is done when the cancer is small.

If you suspect you may have any symptoms, it’s imperative to speak with your GP about the possible cause.

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